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In March of 2003, during the Shock and Awe" military campaign, three American members of a Christian Peacemaker Team were injured in a car accident in the Iraqi desert. (One of those peacemakers, Cliff Kindy, is from North Manchester, Ind.. He came and added his memories to the presentation.) They were taken to Rutba, a Sunni-majority town whose lone hospital had been partially destroyed just three days earlier by U.S. bombs.

The peacemakers feared that they would be targeted for retribution. Instead, they were met with kindness and compassion. Dr. Farouq Al-Dulaimi, who treated their wounds, said, “We take care of everyone - Christian, Muslim, Iraqi, American. It doesn’t matter. We are all human beings. We are all sisters and brothers.” When it came time for the peacemakers to leave, Dr. Al-Dulaimi had one request: “Just go and tell the world about Rutba.”

In his book and his presentations, Barrett has been helping the peacemakers do just that. He emphasized that the barriers people erect between ourselves - along religious, national, political, racial, or economic lines - obscure the fact that, as humans, “we’ve got far more in common with each other than differences.”

Barrett, who spent 20 years traveling the globe as a wire correspondent, has found that to be true wherever he goes. The peacemakers in Iraq, he said, “discovered that ‘the enemy’ wasn’t the enemy.” Instead of being split by doctrinal and national differences, the American Christians and the Iraqi Muslims were united by the experiences and values they shared.

Barrett hopes that people take more from the The Gospel of Rutba than just a heartwarming story. Acknowledging our shared humanity requires us to reevaluate our own beliefs and actions, both individually and collectively, he observed.

Barrett expressed specific concern about U.S. military policy in the Middle East. On a return trip to Iraq in 2010, he spoke with one of the nurses who treated the peacemakers in 2003. Echoing what Barrett had heard around the region, the nurse said, “We love Americans, but we hate your violence.” With bombs and drones, the U.S. government fights terror by using weapons of terror

In doing so, Barrett believes the U.S. is only perpetuating violence and hardening the hearts of people outside the country. He looks to the Christian peacemakers as better examples of how to effect positive change in the Middle East. By going to damaged, destitute areas and acting with empathy to find common ground, Barrett calls these peacemakers “some of the best diplomats America has.”

This event was co-sponsored by the Pulaski County Public Library and the Winamac First United Methodist Church. The library has copies of The Gospel of Rutba available for checkout.

Article submitted by the Pulaski County Public Library

 
 
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Local News Briefs

Communtiy forum to assess needs of older adults

Pulaski County Human Services, together with Northwest Indiana Community Action (NWICA), will conduct a community forum Monday, Feb. 27, in Winamac, to seek public comment on the Area Agency on Aging's area plan.

The forum will run from 11 a.m. to 12 noon, at Pulaski County Human Services, 115 W. Pearl St., Winamac. Refreshments will be served.

 
Next Purdue Extension Nutrition Education program Feb. 23

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Registration open for Ivy Tech CPFM course

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Indiana News

State senate now to consider House's $1.2 billion road funding plan

INDIANAPOLIS – The Indiana House passed the Republicans’ $1.2 billion road funding plan Thursday with no support from Democrats.

House Bill 1002, which passed by a 61-36 vote, calls for Hoosiers to pay an additional 10 cents per gallon in gas taxes, $15 more to register vehicles and a new $150 fee for electric-powered vehicles. The bill would also give the governor permission to install toll roads without a vote by the legislature.

 
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Bill advances to raise cigarette tax, smoking age

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Post News

Felony charges filed against Hamlet man in connection with fatal vehicle accident

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Chief deputy prosecuting attorney Crystal Brucker Kocher annoucned Friday that charges were filed against Cory W. Clemmons, 23, Hamlet, for causing death while operating a motor vehicle.

 
EPCS Board approves projector, bus purchases

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Pulaski County Public Library begins Centennial Fundraising Campaign

From the Pulaski County Public Library

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the original Carnegie library in Winamac, which was completed through the generous donation of benefactor Andrew Carnegie.

For the past 100 years, the Pulaski County Public Library has strived to provide a place where members of the community can learn and grow. The library board of trustees and staff are already dreaming of the opportunities that will await library patrons into the next 100 years.