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Well, okay—so what is a graphic novel? There’s no hard-and-fast definition; opinions differ on whether this or that work counts as a graphic novel, and some authors avoid the term altogether. In general, though, a graphic novel is a story that’s told using sequentially organized panels of images and text. It is a media format that can be used to tell stories of any genre.

In the graphic novel sections at the Pulaski County Public Library, you’ll find currently buzzed-about series (The Walking Dead); superhero comics (Watchmen, Batman: The Court of Owls); Japanese manga (Naruto, Pokémon); memoirs (Maus, Persepolis); biographies (Anne Frank, Feynman); adaptations of classic stories (The Odyssey, Romeo & Juliet), widely loved novels (Black Beauty, A Wrinkle in Time), and contemporary bestsellers (Game of Thrones, Twilight); historical non-fiction (Lewis & Clarke); "Choose Your Own Adventure"-style books (Meanwhile); romance stories (Sand Chronicles); science fiction (To Terra); examinations of mental illness (Psychiatric Tales); religious texts (The Action Bible); and general fiction for all ages. Altogether, the library has over 900 graphic novels.

Reasons to read graphic novels are as varied as the types of stories contained within them. Young children are often drawn to the pictures, and reading graphic novels helps them develop the mechanics of literacy and the ability to make connections between words and images. Older kids and adults can use graphic novels to approach stories or subjects in a way that captivates their interest.

Most importantly, the graphic novel is valuable as a storytelling format in its own right. The combination of words and images allows authors to succinctly add subtle shading to characters and scenes, and it allows readers to interact with the text, consider thematic connections, and travel through a visual narrative at their own pace. Whether for serious reflection or pure entertainment, graphic novels can tell stories differently from any other format.

It’s clear now that the aforementioned preconceptions are based on myths. Graphic novels can be about way more than just superheroes; they can tell stories appropriate for any age; and as a format they have their own virtues, meaning they’re an alternative to (not a replacement for) other media.

If you decide to try a graphic novel, you won’t be alone—their circulation at the library has increased by over 400% in the past two years! All of the graphic novels mentioned are available to check out. If you’re looking for something else, the library staff is happy to answer questions and make recommendations. With more available in the format now than ever before, now’s a great time to come to the library and check out a graphic novel!

 
 
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Local News Briefs

Monterey Days Festival 'Bridge to the Future' Aug. 29-Sept. 1

MONTEREY - The 17th annual Monterey Days Festival will run Friday, Aug. 29 through Monday, Sept. 1, over Labor Day weekend in downtown Monterey. The theme will be "Bridge to the Future."

Grand Marshall will be Priscilla's Fun-N-Learning Preschool/Daycare. The annual parade will step off at 5 p.m., Saturday.

 

 
Pulaski County to host Extension Homemakers district meeting Sept. 3

WINAMAC - Pulaski County will host the fall district meeting of the Extension Homemakers Wednesday (Sept. 3), at the Knights of Columbus Hall, Winamac.

Registration will begin at 9 a.m., followed by the program/meeting at 9:30.

 
Kiwanis Farmers Market Festival Sept. 13

WINAMAC - The annual Farmers Market Festival, sponsored by the Winamac Kiwanis Club, will run from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 13, in downtown Winamac.

The event will feature craft, produce and food booths, family games, and entertainment. The day will begin with the annual Kiwanis Club all-you-can-eat Pancake & Sausage Breakfast (7 to 10 a.m.), in the parking lot at Pearl and Monticello streets.

 
SWCD promoting cover crops for farmers, gardeners

The Pulaski County Soil & Water Conservation District (SWCD) is promoting cover crops this fall. Cover Crops improve soil health, add organic matter, and prevent erosion. 

Area residents have noticed a number of green fields late into the fall and early in the spring. These are area producers interested in improving their soil. 

 
State Park 'Poker Paddle' Sept. 7

WINAMAC - The second annual Poker Paddle will begin at 1 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 7, at Tippecanoe River State Park.

The entry fee is $5. Also, all gate fees apply. Pre-registration at the park office is encouraged. Registration and entry fees will be accepted at the River Picnic Shelter until 12 noon the day of the event.

 
Community Foundation announces grant cycles

The Pulaski County Community Foundation has announced it will offer more grant dollars than ever before through its annual fall grant cycle.

Grants totaling up to $37,000 will be made available, with individual grant awards of up to $7,500.

 
'Glow in the Park' Sept. 27

A "Glow in the Park" benefit 5K Run/Walk will begin at dusk (about 7 p.m.), Saturday (Sept. 27), at the Winamac Town Park, sponsored by Get Fit NonStop of Winamac.

Proceeds from the event will benefit Riley Children's Hospital, Indianapolis.

 
Pulaski County unemployment rate drops to 4.4 percent in July

Pulaski County has fourth-best rate in state

Pulaski County's unemployment rate dropped to 4.4 percent in July, down from 5.0 percent in June, the Indiana Department of Workforce Development reported Monday (Aug. 18). The rate was 6.1 percent a year ago. The county has 6,597 employed persons in a labor force of 6,899. Last month those numbers were 6,580 of 6,925.

The state's July rate remained steady at 5.9 percent (seasonally adjusted), the same as June. The July 2013 rate was 7.6 percent. The U.S. rate inched up to 6.2 percent, from 6.1 percent (seasonally adjusted), in July. A year ago, the national rate was 7.3 percent.

 

 
Kersting’s 'Learn To Ride' provides opportunity for area youth, adults

Kersting’s Cycle Center & Museum opened in 1962, sparked by owner Jim Kersting’s passion for the joy and freedom of riding motorcycles.

Kersting’s hopes to pass along that enthusiasm for motorsports by offering “Learn To Ride” training sessions to interested youth and adults at their facility, located northwest of Winamac. The program is off to a solid start and the initial season of training is scheduled for each Saturday now through Labor Day weekend.

 
Purdue Extension of Pulaski County to hold Poverty Training Sept. 30

In Pulaski County, around 13 percent of the population lives at poverty level. In the state of Indiana, 1 in 5 children go hungry every day. In order to learn how to help meet this great need, one must first understand poverty.

Purdue Extension of Pulaski County will hold a Poverty Simulation at 5 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 30, at the Knights of Columbus in Winamac. This is a free educational event and dinner will be provided. 

 
Civic Players season tickets now on sale

LOGANSPORT - Season tickets for the Civic Players of Logansport 2014-15 season are now on sale.

The season includes “Frankenstein” in September, just in time to kick off the Halloween season; the very funny “Lottie & Bernice Show” in March 2015; and the musical “Chicago” in June 2015. Season tickets can be purchased for $30, with discounts for seniors and students.

 
 

Indy Star Top Stories

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Indystar - Today's Top Stories

Indiana News

Farm data, annexation, property taxes issues addressed by Farm Bureau delegates

INDIANAPOLIS - Delegates to Indiana Farm Bureau’s annual delegate session reaffirmed and strengthened the organization’s long-standing call for property tax reform and also approved new language concerning the emerging issues of big data and unmanned aerial vehicles as they affect agriculture.

More than 260 delegates from across the state met in Indianapolis over the weekend (Aug. 22-24) to consider the policy that will guide Indiana Farm Bureau for the next year. Other topics addressed by the delegates included local government, annexation, animal care and rights of landowners.

 
Teachers call for delay on evaluations, school grades based on new ISTEP test

INDIANAPOLIS – The state’s largest teachers union wants to push pause on plans to tie next year’s school grades and teacher salaries to a new standardized test that remains under development.

The Indiana State Teachers Association is calling on Gov. Mike Pence to “take the lead” in implementing a temporary moratorium on accountability measures that are tied to the new ISTEP test.

 
Office workers can stay active all day long and get in better shape

MUNCIE - Stuck working behind your desk all day long while mired in a hectic lifestyle that leaves you no time to hit the gym on a regular basis?

There are a few simple ways to burn calories during office hours, says Selen Razon, professor of sport and exercise psychology at Ball State.

 
Video & story: Lawmakers consider impact of disease on deer hunting, farming operations

INDIANAPOLIS – State lawmakers heard nearly five hours of testimony from more than 25 individuals Tuesday as part of a study to determine how Indiana should regulate deer farming and whether to legalize fenced hunting.

The Interim Study Committee on Agriculture and Natural Resources – comprised of members from both chambers of the state legislature – heard from veterinarians, deer farmers, and wildlife officials about fenced hunting and the possible diseases the industry may or may not be spreading to the nation’s wild deer population.

 
Tax revenue falls just below projections in July

INDIANAPOLIS – The Indiana State Budget Agency released its monthly report on revenue collection for the general fund – the first of Fiscal Year 2015 – on Wednesday, which showed a 1.7 percent dip in tax receipts compared to estimates.

The state brought in a total of $1.04 billion in July general fund revenue, a decrease of 0.5 percent – about $5.2 million – from the December 2013 state revenue forecast.

 
 

Post News

PMH welcomes new family medicine physician

WINAMAC - Pulaski Memorial Hospital has announced the addition of Dr. Melissa Dawson to the PMH Medical and Surgical Group staff as a family medicine physician.

Board-certified by the American Board of Family Medicine, Dr. Dawson received her medical degree from the Southern Illinois University School of Medicine and recently completed her residency at the Riverside Family Practice Residency Program in Newport News, Va.

 
Updates provided on Panhandle Pathway development

The Friends of the Panhandle Pathway hiking/biking trail met Tuesday (Aug. 26). Among discussion items as an update on the management and future development of the trail.

Begun in 2009, the Panhandle Pathway is a 21-mile linear non-motorized recreational trail that has been developed on the old railroad corridor that runs between Winamac and Kenneth (near France Park), passing through Star City, Thornhope and Royal Center

 
Rainfall varies from drops to a deluge

LANSING, MICH. - Heavy but scattered rain last week provided relief to some farmers while others experienced flooding and crop damage in various regions of the Indiana, according to the USDA, National Agriculture Statistics Service (NASS), Great Lakes Region.

For the week ending Aug. 24, average temperatures ranged from 73 to 80 degrees, and from 2 degrees to 8 degrees above normal.

 
Winamac Town Council listens to pool/swim options, but rejects bids for pool repair

WINAMAC - The Winamac Town Council, at its August meeting, continued to hear updates and consider options and alternatives for instructional and recreational swim opportunities in town, in light of the municipal swimming pool closure this summer due to its age and disrepair.

Also, the council was approached with a proposal to work with the county to work out a uniform zoning code for both the town and the county.

 
Workshop guides emerging entrepreneurs

WINAMAC - The Northwest ISBDC (Small Business Dev continues to offer new and emerging entrepreneurs start-up assistance through its "Launch Your Own Business Workshop: A Sound and Proven Path."

The workshop will be offered from 7 to 9 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 16., at the Pulaski County Public Library, 121 S. Riverside Drive, Winamac.

 
PCPL: Where reading, healthy choices and fun combine

Point summaries, prizes and pizza were just a few things available to the over 200 participants and family members who attended this year’s Pulaski County Public Library Children’s Summer Reading Program Party for "Fizz, Boom, Read and Spark a Reaction."

The PCPL Reading Room was filled to capacity Wednesday evening (Aug. 6), as all program participants received a free book and enjoyed a presentation of this year’s programs. During the celebration, attendees watched a video starring program participants and even parents attending were entered into drawing for State Fair tickets and other various prizes. 

 
Prosecutor files murder charges against Katschke

DENHAM - Murder charges have been filed against a Denham man accused of killing his live-in girlfriend Monday morning (Aug.11), at their residence.

Paul A. Katschke, 39, was taken into custody Monday, according to a report from Sheriff Mike Gayer, and is being held for the death of Amber Rene Taylor, 34.

 
Walorski visits Pulaski County for 'Hoosier Veterans Tour'

Congresswoman stops in Winamac as part of district-wide veterans tour

WINAMAC - Congresswoman Jackie Walorski (IN-02) stopped in Winamac Monday afternoon (Aug. 11) at the Braun Corporation, the world’s largest manufacturer of wheelchair-accessible vans and wheelchair lifts, as part of the “Hoosier Veterans Tour,” a district-wide tour.

 
Chamber study: State water usage must be managed

INDIANAPOLIS – Indiana has enough water for drinking, manufacturing and other uses now but needs to plan to prevent shortages in the future, an Indiana Chamber of Commerce study has found.

The chamber released the report Friday (Aug. 8). It shows that different regions in the state have varying water conditions and will face different types of water concerns in the coming years.

 
West Central Board deals with start-of-school matters

FRANCESVILLE - The West Central School Board approved several last-minute staff resignations and hirings at its meeting Thursday night (Aug. 7), in preparation for the new school year which begins Tuesday (Aug. 12).

The board also approved advertising the 2015 School Budget, Capital Projects Plan and the Bus Replacement Plan. Additionally, the board approved the certified contracts for the 2014-15 school year.