Veterans Day 2017 - Veterans by the numbers
Friday, 10 November 2017 15:06

From U.S. Census Bureau

Veterans Day originated as “Armistice Day” on Nov. 11, 1919, the first anniversary marking the end of World War I.

Congress passed a resolution in 1926 for an annual observance, and Nov. 11 became a national holiday beginning in 1938. President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed legislation in 1954 to change the name to Veterans Day as a way to honor those who served in all American wars.

The day honors military veterans with parades and speeches across the nation and a remembrance ceremony takes place at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va. The ceremony honors and thanks all who served in the U.S. armed forces.

The following facts are made possible by the invaluable responses to the U.S. Census Bureau’s surveys. The Census Bureau appreciates the public’s cooperation as it continuously measures America’s people, places and economy. 

 

Veterans

18.5 million

The number of military veterans in the United States in 2016.

(In Indiana, 6 to 7.9 percent of the adult population are veterans)

Source: 2016 American Community Survey

 

1.6 million

The number of female veterans in the United States in 2016.

Source: 2016 American Community Survey

 

11.6%

The percentage of veterans in 2016 who were black. Additionally, 78.0 percent were non-Hispanic white, 1.6 percent were Asian, 0.7 percent were American Indian or Alaska Native, 0.2 percent were Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, and 1.3 percent were some other race. (The numbers for blacks, non-Hispanic whites, Asians, American Indians and Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders, and some other race cover only those reporting a single race.)

Source:   2016 American Community Survey

 

6.5%

The percentage of veterans in 2016 who were Hispanic.

Source: 2016 American Community Survey

 

9.2 million

The number of veterans age 65 and older in 2016. At the other end of the age spectrum, 1.6 million were younger than age 35.

Source: 2016 American Community Survey

 

When They Served

6.7 million

The number of Vietnam Era veterans in 2016. Moreover, there were 7.1 million who served during the Gulf War (representing service from August 1990 to present); 768,263 who served in World War II; 1.6 million who served in the Korean War; and 2.4 million who served in peacetime only.

Source: 2016 American Community Survey

 

The number of living veterans in 2016 who served during three wartime periods:

65,562 served during the Vietnam Era and both periods of the Gulf War (August 1990 to August 2001 and September 2001 or later).

25,703served during World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam Era.

 

The number of living veterans in 2016 who served during two wartime periods:

1,150,328served during both periods of the Gulf War (August 1990 to August 2001 and September 2001 or later).

285,649 served during the Gulf War (August 1990 to August 2001) and the Vietnam Era.

140,101 served during the Korean War and the Vietnam Era.

56,105served during World War II and the Korean War.

Source: 2016 American Community Survey

 

Where They Live

3

The number of states with 1.0 million or more veterans in 2016. These states were California(1.6 million), Texas (1.5 million) and Florida (1.4 million).

Source: 2016 American Community Survey

 

Education

28.3%

The percentage of veterans 25 years and older with a bachelor’s degree or higher in 2016. In comparison, 31.5 percent of nonveterans had a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Source: 2016 American Community Survey

 

Income

$40,076

The annual median income of male veterans in 2016, compared with $35,365 for male nonveterans.

Source: 2016 American Community Survey

 

$34,178

The annual median income of female veterans in 2016, compared with $23,445 for female nonveterans.

Source: 2016 American Community Survey

 

On the Job

7.0 million

The number of veterans 18 to 64 years old in the labor force in 2016. Of those veterans, 6.7 million were employed.

Source: 2016 American Community Survey

 

Service-Connected Disabilities

4.0 million

The number of veterans with a service-connected disability rating in 2016. Of this number,1.3 million had a rating of 70.0 percent or higher. A “service-connected” disability is one that was a result of a disease or injury incurred or aggravated during active military service. Severity of one’s disability is scaled from 0.0 to 100.0 percent, and eligibility for compensation depends on one’s rating.

Source: 2016 American Community Survey

 

Voting

14.4 million

The number of veterans who voted in the 2016 presidential election. In that election, 69.6 percent of veterans cast a ballot, compared with 60.6 percent of nonveterans. These rates reflect the citizen voting-age population.

Source: Reported Voting and Registration, by Sex, Veteran Status, and Age: November 2016, Table 13

 

Business Owners

398,453

The number of all U.S. employer firms that are majority owned by veterans. Veteran-owned firms comprised 7.2 percent of the nation's 5.5 million employer businesses.

Source: 2015 Annual Survey of Entrepreneurs 

 

 

Nearly One-Quarter of Veterans Live in Rural Areas, Census Bureau Reports

About 5 million (24.1 percent) U.S. veterans 18 years and older lived in areas designated as rural between 2011 and 2015, according to a report from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

The report found that when considering demographic and economic characteristics, rural veterans were similar to urban veterans except for their median household income and employment rates.

Rural veterans had median household incomes more similar to those of rural nonveterans than urban veterans ($53,554 compared with $52,161 and $59,674, respectively). The poverty rate for all rural veterans was 6.9 percent. This rate increased by level of rurality, to a high of 8.6 percent for veterans in completely rural counties. Level of rurality is based on the percentage of the county population living in rural areas.

Working-age rural veterans (18 to 64 years old) had an employment rate of 66.0 percent, lower than rural nonveterans and urban veterans (67.7 percent and 70.7 percent, respectively). The employment rate of rural veterans decreased as the level of rurality increased. Employed rural veterans, however, were more likely to work full time and year-round than rural nonveterans (81.6 percent compared with 71.5 percent).

“In general, rural veterans were different from rural nonveterans in the ways veterans are typically different from nonveterans, and rural veterans were different from urban veterans in the ways all rural residents are different from their urban counterparts,” Kelly Holder, demographer, said. “The two exceptions were employment rates and median household income where rural veterans were more like their rural neighbors.”

These findings are from the Census Bureau’s Veterans in Rural America report that uses American Community Survey 5-year statistics. The Census Bureau released these statistics on Dec. 8, which are available for all geographic areas regardless of population size, down to the block-group level.

 

Other Highlights:

Geography

  • Just under half of all rural veterans lived in the South (45.9 percent), followed by 26.4 percent in the Midwest, 14.1 percent in the West, and 13.7 percent in the Northeast.

Age

  • The median age of rural veterans was about 15 years higher than rural nonveterans and 2 years higher than urban veterans, and their age increased as the level of rurality increased. Rural veterans living in counties that were completely rural were the oldest, with a median age of 66.

Health Insurance

  • During the 2011-2015 period, 5.2 percent of all rural veterans and 15.4 percent of all rural nonveterans were not covered by any type of health insurance plan. Of the rural veterans who had health insurance during this period, 30.3 percent had private insurance only, 24.6 percent had public insurance only, and the remainder (45.1 percent) had a combination of private and public insurance.

 

 

About the American Community Survey

The American Community Survey provides a wide range of important statistics about all communities in the United States. The American Community Survey gives communities the current information they need to plan investments and services. Retailers, homebuilders, fire departments, and town and city planners are among the many private- and public-sector decision makers who count on these annual results. For some examples, visit the Stats in Action page.